How publicly traded Philly Tech stocks held up yesterday

Tom Paine



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Looking at publicly traded Philly Tech companies, only a few were significantly impacted by yesterday's fallout ( I consider +/- 5% to be within normal range for all but the largest tech stocks).

The biggest losers on the day were:

Qlik Technologies (14.9%)

EPAM Systems (11.5%)

MeetMe (6.5%)

Universal Display (5.9%)

Radnor-based Qlik, which was recently panned by Barron's, was definitely impacted by competitor Tableau's problems, which could be both a positive and negative for Qlik. Part of what the market may be seeking is a more rigorous BI Engine, which is Qlik's strength.

It may also help Qlik in recruiting versus Tableau.

SAP  SE, wich has considerable positive momentum right now, was hardly pinged, down 3.6%.


Correction: An earlier version of this article mistakenly included USA Technogies among
companies losing 5% or more of their market value yesterday.


Links 2/6: What the heck happened at Tableau?; LendingClub Models Misfire as Loan Write-Offs Top Forecasts






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What the heck happened at Tableau? It gruesome. (Denn Howlett/Diginomica)



After $66 Billion Goes Poof, Cloud Software Stock Outlook Turns Very Foggy (Re/code)

Are We Seeing Another Dotcom Crash?
(Fortune)

Twitter will change its timeline to use algorithm, BuzzFeed says (Marketwatch)

Dorsey Says Twitter Is Not Planning to Reorder Timelines Next Week (Bloomberg)


LendingClub Models Misfire as Loan Write-Offs Top Forecasts (Bloomberg)

Comcast grabs 475 acres in Orlando for theme park (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Deal Shows Investors Are Willing to Make a Blind Bet on Uber (NY Times)


Bill McDermott on SAP's transition to the Cloud (Bloomberg Video)






Tableau, on weaker outlook, down 49% today; sparks tech sector slump


Tom Paine



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I don't usually report on stock movements.

But Qlik competitor Tableau (NYSE: DATA) saw the bottom drop out this morning after an earnings report yesterday that concerned some and a disappointing outlook going into 2016.

Its shares are down 49% so far today.

Tableau’s outlook for the current quarter missed Wall Street views, and its revenue for Q4 2015 met expectations but disappointed some.

“We have data and have heard anecdotally that the Tableau solution is the most expensive in the market when compared with” products from rivals Microsoft (MSFT) and Qlik Technologies (QLIK.), Summit Research analyst Srini Nandury told Investor's Business Daily. Some also mentioned an impact from Amazon.com’s AWS QuickSight.

Q4 revenue rose 42% to $202.8 million. Tableau's net (GAAP) loss of 57 cents a share was influenced by a negative tax adjustment.

One might say that Tableau's results don't look too bad, but momentum stocks pay a heavy price when the expectations bubble bursts. I don't have the time, but someone could do a great dataviz of recent Tableau price movements.

QLIK is down 15% today.


Update 3:40pm: Tableau seems to be dragging the whole tech sector down.


The Nasdaq Bloodbath Led by LinkedIn, Tableau (Wall Street Journal: MoneyBeat)

Tableau finished the day down 49.5%, Qlik 15%.


Links 2/5; SAP Uses Super Bowl 50 To Test Data Visualization, UX; Oracle suggests Amazon's cloud isn't real






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Cue the surprise: Oracle suggests Amazon's cloud isn't real (Computerworld)

The Nasdaq Bloodbath Led by LinkedIn, Tableau (Wall Street Journal: MoneyBeat)

LinkedIn Plunges, Torpedoed by Fears of Slower Growth (Re/code)


Meet the best venture capital firm you’ve never heard of — it had 7 of its companies go public since 2014 (Business Insider)

SAP Uses Super Bowl 50 To Test Data Visualization, UX (Information Week)


There’s still a gap in the Smart Home app (Embedded Computng Design)




Four takeaways from yesterday (2/4)






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Bob Moul has been named chief executive officer of Philadelphia-based Cloudamize

Paul Melchiorre, former President of Exton-based iPipeline, gets big job with unicorn Anaplan

Shares of QlikTech competitor Tableau plunge 36% after company posts $41M loss in Q4

ESPN Says Skinny Bundles Are Big. Comcast Says They’re Not


Melchiorre, former President of Exton-based iPipeline, gets big job with unicorn Anaplan

Tom Paine



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Paul Melchiorre / LinkedIn


Paul Melchiorre, former President of Exton-based iPipeline , was appointed global Chief Revenue Officer of San Francisco-based Anaplan today. Melchiorre’s appointment follows Anaplan’s recent announcement that it raised $90 million in a funding round.

Prior to iPipeline, he served as Global Vice President for Ariba, the B to B supply chain software company acquired by SAP  in 2012. Before that, he was an executive with SAP.

A graduate of Villanova (undergrad) and Drexel (MBA), Melchiorre has been omnipresent on the Philly Tech scene, working with numerous startups such as ExpenseWatch, ListenLogic and VC firm MissionOG.

One former SAP associate said on LinkedIn: "The way it was told to me, Paul basically built Ariba ... Actually I know Paul much better from his many years with SAP, where not only did he lead the company in sales but did so while being a hell of a nice guy."

Ariba was an early competitor to Malvern's Verticalnet, and both crashed in the 2000 era tech bust. But Ariba came back to survive and prosper, while Verticalnet barely hung on.

Anaplan, which calls itself "the enterprise planning cloud company", announced a $90 million round at a valuation of S1.09 billion post funding in January, and hired a new CFO. It definitely indicated it is planning for an IPO. It competes with older-line companies such as SAP, as well as other new-breed SaaS business planning startups.

Melchiorre left iPipeline after it was acquired by PE firm Thoma Bravo last year.




Links 2/4: Shares of Tableau plunge 36% after earnings report; Tech in NJ: Forget Silicon Valley, be Seattle






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ESPN Says Skinny Bundles Are Big. Comcast Says They’re Not. The Future of TV Is Confused. (Re/code)

uBeam doesn't want to just charge your phone — it wants to send data to it too (Business Insider)

Amid big changes in Philly media, startup Billy Penn sticks to its vision (Columbia Journalism Review)

Shares of Tableau plunge 36% after company posts $41M loss in Q4 (GeekWire)

Tech in NJ: Forget Silicon Valley; be Seattle (Asbury Park Press)

IBM Buys Germany’s Ecx.io, Its Third Creative Services Acquisition In A Week (TechCrunch)




Moul becomes CEO at Philly-based Cloudamize; Founder Shah to serve as chief evangelist & board chair


Tom Paine



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Bob Moul / LinkedIn
Bob Moul, former CEO of Boomi (sold to Dell) and Artisan Mobile (acquired by TUNE) has been named chief executive officer of Philadelphia-based Cloudamize, effective February 1. Cloudamize is a leader in cloud infrastructure analytics and cost optimization.

Khushboo Shah, who has led the company as founder since its inception, will continue to serve as chief evangelist and will chair its board of directors.

“I am thrilled that Bob has agreed to join the company,” said Shah in statement. “He has been a close advisor for many years and brings deep insights into our market, our customers, and our partners. With his proven 35-year track record in hi-tech, he is ideally suited to take Cloudamize to the next level and to achieve our vision as the leader in maximizing cloud value for our customers.”

Moul has also been a visible leader in Philadelphia's tech community. And he gave an honest self-assessment of his missteps at Artisan, which reportedly sold for less than the amount invested in it.

Cloudamize is venture-backed by MissionOG, DreamIt Ventures, and Gabriel Investments. It has received $1.2 million in venture capital, according to CrunchBase. There's been no indication yet that additional funding is tied to Moul's new role.

Moul described in a separate blog post how he met Shah four years ago when he was coaching her in an incubator program, and has worked with her ever since.

I profiled Shah and Cloudamize a
Khushboo Shah / LinkedIn
little more than a year ago, I was very impressed with what they where doing, but wondered about the company's ability to scale up in a rapidly exploding market. Moul's entry is intended to address just that.

There are so many companies named 'Cloud' around, I think it needs some explaining. Cloudamize may be complementary to CloudNexa and shares a common investor, but is not a direct competitor (at least that's how it appeared a year ago). Cloudmine and Cloudamize share some common investors and might be helpful to each other, but are really two different businesses.

First Round Capital is an investor in a Portland-based company called Cloudabilty, that's raised $16 million and does appear to be in the same space as Cloudamize.

A year ago, Cloudamize seemed focused solely on cost optimization and tracking for Amazon Web Services customers. AWS was at a $10 billion annual run rate in the 4th quarter. But Shah's plan was to expand its range of services to other clouds, It appears to have expanded to cover Microsoft Azure, the second most popular public cloud.


Curalate rases $27.5 million




Image Recognition Invades Shopping As Curalate Raises $27.5M (TechCrunch)


Comcast: Earnings & Key Takeaways


Tom Paine



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Comcast earnings calls are extraordinarily well orchestrated (includng pre-call music), and you have to look for small nuances for signs of significant news.

The biggest headliner this quarter was video subscriber growth. Comcast added 89,000 video customers in the last quarter of 2015, which was its best quarter since the 2006. For the full year, Comcast lost 36,000 video customers, the smallest drop since 2007. At a time when other cable companies seem to be downplaying prospects for video subscribers, Comcast saw a boost which it attributes primarily to its continuing X1 rollout and reduced churn. X1 is now in 30% of video subs, and Comcast's year end target is 50%.

Comcast also plans to file as a bidder in next month’s auction of wireless spectrum, it said, emphasizing that the move was exploratory and implied no commitment. In fact, it seemed to question the feasibility of hybrid networks, specifically the technology for the handoff from cellular to WiFi.

Comcast Cable CEO Neil Smit: "We've build out the public spots based on the usage trends we see and I think it's – concerning the handoff between Wi-Fi and cellular, there is some technology out there. The question is whether you'd need to do the handoff or not and how seamless it would be. But we are looking at technology in that space as well."

CEO Brian Roberts said management often was amused by some of the acquisition rumors the media perpetrates, perhaps referring to the constant Sprint speculation and  stories such as this one floated by UK media. He gave the stock 'we're happy with what we've got but would look at opportunties' type of answer. I doubt that they are truly that unscripted, but have no idea what they
would buy at this point, though take comments in the recent past about international expansion seriously. Eventually I would expect something more significant than last year's Universal Japan deal.

Comcast cormfirned it had acquired 475 acres near Universal Orlando for $130 million. Theme parks have been a sweet spot for NBC Universal, providing continued double-digit growth, so its eager to expand in this area.

Roberts said that the company's new fund run by former CFO Michael Angelakis is "scouring the globe for smart investments."

Comcast also said its new large enterprise telecom effort was up and running, and had twenty major customers.

For the record, revenue for 2015 rose 8.5% to $19.2 billion, well ahead of estimates. Comcast's fourth-quarter profit grew 2.4% to $1.97 billion, or 79 cents a share, up from $1.93 billion, or 74 cents a share, a year ago.